The second half is all uphill

The first and last time I do a race like that. Maybe.
The first and last time I do a race like that. Maybe.

A few weeks ago, I did a half-marathon that was easily the hardest I’d ever done. The distance wasn’t the hard part – it was that most of it involved going up and down a small mountain. Radical inclines, steep dropoffs right next to the path, the whole shebang.

Sure, some of it was extremely daunting, and sometimes I had to walk, but I was determined to keep pushing until I crossed the finish line (2:22:26, which wasn’t too bad, especially taking that whole mountain aspect into consideration).

The whole time during that first half, as I was working my way up, there were two thoughts that kept me going:

1. Even though this is harder than I expected, I want to keep going and do the best I can
2. Once the halfway point is reached, it’s literally all downhill from here

While the first thought can easily be applied to writing a script, the second one – not so much.

There’s a reason the midpoint of a script is sometimes referred to as The Point of No Return. Not only is your protagonist now fully committed to achieving their goal, but so are you.

While their situation becomes more daunting and their goal more unreachable, it might feel just as insurmountable to you.  But, as I once again utilize the running analogy, your diligent training and extensive preparation have made you ready to take this on.

You know what has to happen between here and the end. The stakes are raised, and only you can ensure a satisfying finish. All you can do is dig deep, draw on your reserve strength and keep pushing yourself until you’re done.

Make sure you pace yourself and take your time. Rushing can only hurt you, so stay focused.  It may seem like the end will never arrive, but you’ll get there before you know it.

What’s great about finishing a race is you get a medal, and most likely the desire to do better next time. Finish a script and you’ve got a finished draft and hopefully the desire to make it better.

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